Touched by the Lord’s hand: The history of Multiple Sclerosis

Although the signs of MS have been observed for more than 175 years, it is still quite misunderstood. How did we first learn of the existence of MS, and how much have we learned in all these years about this disease chronic and debilitating illness and its treatment? … More Touched by the Lord’s hand: The history of Multiple Sclerosis

Voluntary Veil: The Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment in the First World War

Before the mid 19th century, women had a discreet but ever-present role on the battlefield, mostly as camp followers. When women such as Florence Nightingale started to demonstrate the value of military nurses, armies began to slowly, but surely assign them to their medical services. … More Voluntary Veil: The Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment in the First World War

A Hair-Razing History of the Beard: Facial Hair and Men’s Health from the Crimean War to the First World War

The period following the Crimean War and until the end of the First World War marks an interesting time for men’s fashion and health. During the Victorian period, beards and other facial hair styles enjoyed resurgence in popularity which had not been seen since the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.[1] While the facial hair trend waned by the end of the nineteenth century,[2] enthusiasm for debating the cleanliness and overall health of bearded and non-bearded men remained strong. With increased attention to the face, and more specifically the hair on it, doctors, nurses, soldiers and the general public engaged in spirited discussions of men’s health. … More A Hair-Razing History of the Beard: Facial Hair and Men’s Health from the Crimean War to the First World War

Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation

There is significant public debate over the merits and risk of vaccinations, much of which is fueled by inflammatory rhetoric rather than facts and science.  This debate has raged ever since the first vaccine for smallpox was proposed by Dr. Edward Jenner in the 1790s and, doubtless, it will continue as new vaccines are developed.  … More Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation

The APPle of our Eye: 80 Years of Hospital History in the Palm of your Hand!

In 2011, the Museum received the fantastic news that it had been awarded a grant for $52,000 from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.  This funding enabled the Museum to leap with both feet into an exciting two-year project to develop not one, but two new apps that will allow users to explore local medical and nursing history on their phones and mobile devices. … More The APPle of our Eye: 80 Years of Hospital History in the Palm of your Hand!

Medicine in the Mushkegowuk: A Connection Between North and South

Residents of Kingston will be aware of the positive impact that the local hospitals have on our city’s overall health, but what many of us might not know is that they have a much wider reach than just Kingston and its neighbouring communities; in fact, Kingston General Hospital, Hotel Dieu and Providence Care have been intimately linked with a hospital in a remote area of northern Ontario for the past fifty years. … More Medicine in the Mushkegowuk: A Connection Between North and South

A Tribute to Canada’s Nurses: Celebrating Nursing Week 2013

In Canada, the hard work and dedication of nurses is formally recognized during National Nursing Week, the second week of May.  International Nurses Day, designated by the International Council of Nurses in 1974, is celebrated on May 12th.  This day was chosen as significant because it is Florence Nightingale’s birthday. … More A Tribute to Canada’s Nurses: Celebrating Nursing Week 2013