“Something Permanent for the Country”: The Sir Oliver Mowat Memorial Tuberculosis Sanatorium

An often overlooked part of Kingston’s rich medical history, the Sir Oliver Mowat Memorial Tuberculosis Sanatorium, or simply the Mowat Sanatorium, enjoyed an important, if short-lived, role in the fight against tuberculosis in Canada. … More “Something Permanent for the Country”: The Sir Oliver Mowat Memorial Tuberculosis Sanatorium

The Wild and Wacky World of Drug Advertisements

Back in the late 1800s, a time where saying yes to drugs might have actually been encouraged, patent medicines promised wild and wonderful cures. These medicines, as opposed to those prescribed by a doctor, were loosely regulated; leading to extravagant claims and dangerous, often unlisted, ingredients. From cure-alls to cough syrup, these medicines promised to treat a variety of ailments for those who could not afford a private doctor’s visit, although they would often do more harm than good. … More The Wild and Wacky World of Drug Advertisements

Maternal Mental Health Care

More so than practically any other healthcare subject, mental health topics have acquired a need in recent decades for routine updating and research to compensate for centuries of misinformation. The infiltration of the Maternal Mental Hygiene movement and Attachment Theory into the minds and maternity manuals of Canada can shed light onto the progression of the treatment of maternal mental health across the decades. … More Maternal Mental Health Care

Electroconvulsive Therapy: Controversial, even at Conception

On March 9, 2020, Justice Minister David Lametti introduced Bill C-8, which would amend Canada’s Criminal Code to ban Conversion Therapy. With this ban being proposed in the House of Commons, it is important to understand the history of Conversion Therapy, as well as how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has played a key role in the practice. … More Electroconvulsive Therapy: Controversial, even at Conception

The Introduction of Psychiatric Nursing: The Rockwood Training School for Nurses

Nurses were expected to be proficient in both mental health and physical nursing, as well as to be knowledgeable of the various mental illnesses and how they may appear. For the majority of the nineteenth century, trained nurses did not work at hospitals or asylums. The members of staff who interacted frequently with the patients … More The Introduction of Psychiatric Nursing: The Rockwood Training School for Nurses

Moral Treatment: A New Therapeutic Model

Organized sports and bicycling were also popular. These activities were believed to assist recovery, as they broke up the monotony of asylum life. In the late nineteenth century, Rockwood Asylum underwent a drastic change in treatment philosophies. Begun under the guidance of the third Superintendent Dr. William Metcalf, and continued by Dr. Charles Kirk Clarke, … More Moral Treatment: A New Therapeutic Model

A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the Beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine

Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. was born 1827 in Essex, England. Lister found that 45-50% of amputation patients later died of infection.  Spurred by this statistic, he undertook the experiments on the prevention of infection that earned him wide renown. … More A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the Beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine