Treatments for Menstrual Cramps throughout History

The following blog post was written by Shaelagh Cull, Summer 2015 Public Programs Assistant .   “My pen cannot express the anguish and pain suffered by some women…”:[1] For many women, each month until menopause will bring with it a new menstrual cycle. Anywhere between twenty to ninety percent of women will experience painful cramping, … More Treatments for Menstrual Cramps throughout History

Laudanum: Freedom from Pain for the Price of Addiction

The following blog post was written by Lucy Gall, Summer 2015 Public Programs Assistant . On Canada Day, the Museum of Health Care unveiled a new exhibit entitled “A Stubborn Illness” about the health of Sir John A. Macdonald and his family. When I first toured the gallery I was struck by the intriguing medicine … More Laudanum: Freedom from Pain for the Price of Addiction

Touched by the Lord’s hand: The history of Multiple Sclerosis

the following blog post was written by Museum of Health Care Curator Maxime Chouinard  Many Canadians will have to deal with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in their lifetime. According to medical researchers, it appears that this illness becomes more and more common as one moves away from the Equator. MS could be directly related to the … More Touched by the Lord’s hand: The history of Multiple Sclerosis

Voluntary Veil: The Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment in the First World War

the following blog post was written by Museum of Health Care Curator Maxime Chouinard Today, the Museum of Health Care is unveiling its newest onsite exhibition titled Trench Menders: Health Care in the First World War. This exhibition centers on the work of the Canadian Army Medical Corps during the Great War and its accomplishments in the … More Voluntary Veil: The Canadian Voluntary Aid Detachment in the First World War

A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 1

*the following blog post was written by 2013 Margaret Angus Research Fellow Robert Engen When we think about war and health care our imaginations are immediately drawn to ideas of war wounds, amputations, mobile surgical hospitals, and even psychiatric trauma and PTSD. These are among the most visible marks that war can leave on its … More A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 1

A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine

Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. was born 1827 in Essex, England.  He graduated from University College, London, with a Bachelor of Medicine in 1852 and, at age 26, entered the Royal College of Surgeons.  Shortly thereafter, he moved to Edinburgh to pursue his career and practice.  In 1860 he accepted the position of Chair of Clinical … More A Century Gone – Sir Joseph Lister, Bt. (1827-1912): Antisepsis and the beginnings of Modern Surgical Medicine

A Brief History of Isolation and Infectious Disease

Contagious disease has challenged society throughout human history. Quarantine and isolation was practiced in response to the pandemics of bubonic plague and cholera, beginning in the Middle Ages. In the 18th and 19th centuries, smallpox led to smallpox hospitals in some large urban communities. At the same time, citizens lived with the fear of outbreaks … More A Brief History of Isolation and Infectious Disease