Mental Health: Tracing the History of Stigma

The following blog post was written by Abbey Cressman, Summer 2014 Public Programs Assistant   When researching ancient diseases, their symptoms, and treatments, I have often been struck by the correlation between the magnitude of lives lost and the health care standards of the time. I have read staggering statistics that throughout the nineteenth century, … More Mental Health: Tracing the History of Stigma

From Variolation to Cowpox Vaccination: The First Steps Towards Eradicating Smallpox

*The following blog post was written by Samantha Sandassie, Queen’s University PH.D candidate/teaching fellow Edward Jenner looms large in the history of vaccination.  Known today as the “father of immunology,” Jenner is most famous for developing a vaccine against smallpox in the 1790s.  The vaccine brilliantly made use of common knowledge.  Milkmaids were known for … More From Variolation to Cowpox Vaccination: The First Steps Towards Eradicating Smallpox

Dispelling childhood fears about medicine and the hospital

The following blog post was written by Derek Oxley,  2013-2014 Work Study (Queen’s University) Curatorial Assistant Although my own recollections are a bit hazy, my mother will attest to the fact that when I had to be taken to the doctor as a small child I behaved like a perfect hellion: stomping feet and throwing … More Dispelling childhood fears about medicine and the hospital

Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation

the following post was written by Pamela Peacock, Museum Curator  The Museum of Health Care is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition, Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation.  Developed with Guest Curator Dr. Christopher Rutty, and funded in part by the Kingston and United Way Community Fund, the Coalition of … More Vaccines and Immunization: Epidemics, Prevention, and Canadian Innovation

A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 3

*the following blog post was written by 2013 Margaret Angus Research Fellow Robert Engen As we saw in the last blog post, from a medical point of view the two military campaigns to capture the Dutch island of Walcheren – the first in 1809, the second in 1944 – could not have been more different. … More A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 3

A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 2

*the following blog post was written by 2013 Margaret Angus Research Fellow Robert Engen     Two of the most remarkable stories in military medical history happened in the exact same place: Walcheren, a strip of land that sits like a cork in the mouth of the Scheldt River running through the Netherlands and Belgium. … More A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 2

A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 1

*the following blog post was written by 2013 Margaret Angus Research Fellow Robert Engen When we think about war and health care our imaginations are immediately drawn to ideas of war wounds, amputations, mobile surgical hospitals, and even psychiatric trauma and PTSD. These are among the most visible marks that war can leave on its … More A Fighting Chance: Disease, Public Health, and the Military, Part 1

The APPle of our eye: 80 years of hospital history in the palm of your hand!

*the following blog post was written by Dr. Pamela Peacock, Museum Curator  Shortly after I arrived at the Museum of Health Care as Curator in the fall of 2011, the Museum received the fantastic news that it had been awarded a grant for $52,000 from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.  This funding enabled the Museum to … More The APPle of our eye: 80 years of hospital history in the palm of your hand!

What’s so now about history?

The following blog post was written by Lucy Vorobej, summer 2013 Public Program Assistant  My initial interaction with medical history at the Museum of Health Care was a gruesome and gory encounter as I imagined past medical realities of surgery without anesthesia and those oh-so-unnerving humour-balancing blood-sucking leeches (eek!). However, despite the occasional queasiness induced … More What’s so now about history?